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Monday, December 05, 2005

Old and New Testament

Further Think Tank discussions on the post below:


From Skip March:

I tend to see much more overlap (The Messiah thing notwithstanding), particularly with the New Testament books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. Matthew , in fact, was writing his story for a largely Jewish audience. Mark and Luke more for Greek and Gentile. Anyway much to discuss on this. Jesus was not rejecting the Jewish faith, rather those who he saw corrupting it. At the center of both faiths, however, is the First Covenant. Hhhhmmmm it also seems to be at the core of our own laws.

From Allen Gorin:

Skip:

Since Bill informs me that you were a religion major--and obviously that interest in religion hasn't waned--you might want to get a hold of a book entitled "Revolution in Judaea: Jesus and the Jewish Resistance" by Hyam Maccoby. The book is out of print, but so popular that it often fetches over a hundred bucks in the pre-owned book marketplace.

I've read Maccoby's book several times, and can say without a doubt that it challenges both the traditional Christian and Jewish views of Jesus--more so the former.

Regards,

Allen

From Neal Phenes:

Skip and All:

I have just finished reading Biblical Literacy by Joseph Telushkin. Within its discussion of the "Old Testament", known to the Jews as "The Bible", there are references to the various Scriptures and other Christian writings that show consistent, and inconsistent, treatment of Old Testament prophesies and stories. I found it illuminating in making relevant to today so many issues explained by the traditional teachings.

Neal

Skip responds:


Of course Jewish Prophecies were used to make the Messiah argument. New Testament Gospel writers wrote their versions, I am sure with consistencies and accuracies as well as inconsistencies and inaccuracies with Prophecies. Given Matthew's audience and orientation I wonder if his version would be the best starting point to analyze this. It is generally accepted though that the Book of Mark is the earliest and most historically accurate and therefore from that standpoint Matthew, Luke and John would have used Mark as a starting source for their stories.

Particularly noteworthy is that the Book of Mark starts with Jesus' baptism by John the Baptist, not including Jesus' birth. Matthew may have added this with noteworthy parallels to Moses' birth and more definitively putting Jesus in the House of David lineage. Anyway, much richness in the Old and New texts...........

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